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A sad day for NTC

News — 2nd July 2015

On a sad day for NTC and beyond, Ruth Ross, NTC College Governor and Secretary to the Board of Governors passed away suddenly on Monday 29th June while on holiday in California with her husband Chris. Ruth was also Treasurer at Parkhead Church of the Nazarene in Glasgow, and Deputy Head Teacher at Airdrie Academy.

Ruth is Karl and Ingrid Stanfield’s sister (Brooklands Church, Manchester) and has many close connections to the College. Ruth has 3 children – Deborah, Matthew and Philip, and 5 grandchildren. Their 2 sons have travelled to California to be with their dad, while Deborah is returning from Kenya to be with the family in Manchester until her dad and brothers arrive home. Ruth has 2 brothers, Chris and Paul, and also her mum and dad, John and Vera Packard, are with the family in Manchester.

As a church family Parkhead Church of the Nazarene has been particularly affected: ‘It has been such difficult news to hear and feel. We’re coming together at church to support one another and pray for Chris and the family.’ With such tragic news, we invite you to join with us in praying for Ruth’s husband Chris and the rest of the family. Ruth will be deeply missed by many who were like an extended family to her and so we also pray for the church at Parkhead as they face this loss too.

Rev. Dr. Deirdre Brower Latz, College Principal summarised the thoughts of all at NTC:

‘We were deeply saddened to learn of Ruth Ross’s untimely death, she was both a College Governor and a good friend to so many of us. Godly and gifted, as a member of the Board of Governors she served as its secretary, a post which she held with distinction. She had sensitivity, passion for the college, was visionary and professional, and she was a vibrant contributor to our discussion and direction and will be greatly missed.’